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    Air Pollution Dog Blog — urban air pollution

    Thousands Evacuated as California Wildfires Rage

    Thousands Evacuated as California Wildfires Rage

    Much of California in the United States was on high alert on Friday as wind-driven wildfires tore through the state's south, forcing the evacuation of tens of thousands of people and destroying multiple structures and homes. 

    Fire officials said an 89-year-old woman died in Calimesa, about 70 miles east of Los Angeles, when fire swept through a trailer park overnight after the driver of a dust cart that caught fire dumped his burning load nearby. 

    Another man in his 50s died on Thursday night from cardiac arrest as he spoke with firefighters battling the so-called Saddleridge brush fire in the San Fernando Valley, about 32km (20 miles) north of downtown Los Angeles, fire officials said. 

    California Saddleridge fire smoke effects on dogs and pets

    That fire grew rapidly, prompting evacuation orders for more than 100,000 people. Los Angeles Fire Department Chief Ralph Terrazas said the blaze that started late on Thursday in the city of Sylmar was being fueled by dry conditions and high winds known as the Santa Ana winds. 

    "This is a very dynamic fire, Terrazas told a news conference. "Do not wait to leave," he urged residents. "If we ask you to evacuate, please evacuate." He said some 1,000 firefighters were fighting the blaze that was 13 percent contained by early afternoon and had forced the shutdown of several major highways. The metro line in the area was also shut as were schools and businesses. 

    Red flag warnings At least 25 buildings have been destroyed by the blaze, the cause of which has not been determined. "We've calculated that the fire is moving at a rate of 800 acres [325 hectares] per hour," Terrazas said, adding that it would probably take days to get it under control.

    Some 200 firefighters, water-dropping helicopters and firefighting airplanes were meanwhile battling several blazes, including the one that tore through the trailer park in Riverside County.

    California Fires cause suffering for pets, dogs, cats wildfire smoke

    There were no immediate reports of injuries, but authorities ordered some homes in the area be evacuated. The National Weather Service said it expects the high winds fanning the flames to subside, making it easier for firefighters to get the situation under control. 

    A red flag warning - which indicates ripe conditions for wildfires - remains in effect through Saturday. "That seems to be the new normal in California," lamented Sylmar resident Oscar Mancillas, as he helplessly watched the flames spread in the hillside near his home. 

    "I mean the vegetation is so dry ... but we're kind of lucky because it didn't grow back from the last fire," he told AFP news agency. "In California, you have to be earthquake ready and you have to be fire ready ... and for those of us who have a family, it's a little daunting sometimes." 

    The wildfires in the south erupted as California's largest utility, Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E), implemented rolling power blackouts that affected some two million people in northern California this week.

    About 312,000 customers remained in the dark on Friday as a result of the shutoffs designed to reduce the threat of wildfire that can be sparked by lines downed in strong winds. 

    Many schools and universities were also closed in northern parts of the state as people stocked up on gasoline, water, batteries and other basics, with frustration mounting at the blackouts condemned by some as "third world".

    Dogs and Wildfire Smoke

    "We're seeing a scale and scope of something that no state in the 21st century should experience," Governor Gavin Newsom said on Thursday, blaming decades of what he called neglect and mismanagement by PG&E. 

    "This is not, from my perspective, a climate change story as much as a story about greed and mismanagement over the course of decades," Newsom said. "Neglect, a desire to advance not public safety but profits." 

    K9 Mask for Wildfire Smoke

    PG&E has defended the outages as necessary for safety reasons and has said it will take days before power is restored to all customers as inspections must be conducted on all power lines and equipment before the lights can be turned back on. "This is not how we want to serve you but blackouts can happen again," Bill Johnson, the CEO of the company said on Thursday. 

    Last November, PG&E's faulty power lines were determined to have sparked the deadliest wildfire in the state's modern history, which killed 86 and destroyed the town of Paradise.

    Effects of Air Pollution on Pets and Dogs

    How Air Pollution Effects Your Pets

    People aren't the only ones who can suffer ill effects from exposure to air pollution. Many pet owners have concerns about the effects of air pollution on their animals, and scientists are beginning to study the potential risks for pets that have exposure to air pollution.

    Research has confirmed the dangers of air pollution for humans. People who are exposed to excessive air pollution have an increased risk of developing respiratory issues such as wheezing, coughing, shortness of breath, and chest tightness. Cardiovascular disease is another potential health issue connected to exposure to air pollution. Those with pre-existing cardiovascular disease as well as elderly people and young children may even be at risk for premature death from pollution exposure.

    Urban Air Pollution and Pets

    Sources of Air Pollution

    Air pollution originates from many different sources. Fumes from wildfire smoke, vehicle traffic, power plants, construction, the burning of coal and gasoline. Homes can be filled with pollution from sources such as wood-burning stoves and fireplaces, tobacco smoke, and cooking. Pets living in urban areas have a higher exposure to and risk from smog and exhaust pollutants, while animals living in rural areas may be exposed to chemicals due to the spraying of herbicides, fungicides, and insecticides.

    Scientific Studies about Air Pollution

    Studies have shown that pets living in homes with cigarette-smokers have increased health risks, perhaps even greater than those for humans living in the same homes. This is because pets spent more time near the floor, where smoke concentrations are higher. Cats exposed to secondhand smoke have been shown to have reduced lung function when compared to felines living in smoke-free homes, according to scientific research. Scientists are also exploring links between common indoor activities such as smoking and the use of cleaning products and certain cancers in dogs.

    Pets are also at risk from outdoor air pollution. In a recent study of dogs in Mexico City, scientists examined the brains of local dogs to compare them with the brains of dogs in cities with less pollution. The brains of dogs living in Mexico City showed inflammation, amyloid plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles, which are associated with Alzheimer's disease in humans.

    Another study conducted by the University of Massachusetts and the Tufts University Cummings School of Medicine involved 700 dog owners and their use of pesticides. The results showed that about a third of the dogs had canine malignant lymphoma, a type of cancer. The study also showed that the dogs had a 70 percent higher chance of developing lymphoma if the owners used pesticides in their yards.

    Affect of Air Pollution on Animals and Pets

    Cats have also been found to be more likely to develop asthma when exposed to indoor or outdoor pollutants. Felines living in homes where a wood-burning fireplace is in use or smoking occurs are often found to have a marked decrease in lung function.

    Taking Steps to Reduce Pets' Exposure to Air Pollution

    Because many pets spend the majority of their time indoors or in their yard, it's important for owners to take steps to minimize exposure to air pollution both inside and out.

    • Change air filters often.
    • Vacuum frequently to remove hair and other pollutants.
    • Avoid smoking indoors.
    • Choose chemical-free cleaning products when possible.
    • Reduce carbon emissions when possible by carpooling, taking a bus, or biking.
    • Choose areas for outdoor exercise of pets where the air is cleaner (away from highways).
    • Use chemical-free products in the yard whenever possible.

    Dog Air Pollution Filter Mask

    Our dog pollution mask is engineered for extreme environments. We use N95 and PM2.5 dog pollution mask air filter protection including Activated Carbon air filters. K9 Mask dog muzzle filter technology protects against smoke, smog, emissions, mold, allergies, toxins, chemicals, and bacteria. Created for dogs to uniquely fit the shape of a dog muzzle and protect a dog from extreme air pollution. K9 Masks are washable and have air filter refills for pure air every time your dog wears it. Choose clean air for your dog.

    More About Pets and Air Pollution:

    7 Harmful Effects of Air Pollution on Your Beloved Pets

    7 Harmful Effects of Air Pollution on Your Beloved Pets

    Do your pets get affected by toxic air pollution the same way as people do? The answer is "Yes." Animals do get affected equally by air pollution. Degrading air quality is something to blame for the ever shortening life spans of our beloved pets. While we do care for our pets, what we commonly overlook is the effect of pollution on them.

    Continuous and prolonged exposure to degraded air quality can give rise to a variety of lung, throat and nose diseases in your pets, such as bronchitis or even asthma. Here we present you some ways in which degraded air quality affects our furry friends and what all we can do to resist that.

    Wildfire smoke effects on health of dog lungs

    Smog affects the health of your pet

    Smoggy days are bad not just for you, but for your furry friend too! Smog causes severe ailments because of the quality of air they breathe in. It may cause breathing troubles leading to suffocation. This can be fatal for our pets in periods of intense and prolonged exposure.

    • Remedy: Keeping your pets indoors during phases of smog would greatly help the cause. It is advisable to not take your pet out for a walk during one of those smoggy days. Using a dog air pollution mask is a helpful way to take your dog on a short walk to stretch the legs and go to the bathroom

    Passive smoking affects pets

    Passive smoke from cigarette smoking is an air quality problem for your dog and pets. A recent study showed that pets in smoke-free homes have healthier lungs than their counterparts living in smoke-prone homes. The passive smoking is detrimental to their lung health as they tend to spend most of their time on the floor.

    Smoke from cigarettes effects indoor air pollution for dogs

    • Remedy: Smoking isn’t just bad for your health; it affects your pets as well. Establish a separate smoking zone in your homes where your pets won’t have access, or better still, quit smoking for good!

    Indoor activities can cause cancer!

    You might think that being clean is great, and indeed it is, but the fact also depends on certain other factors to be true. Certain indoor activities like cleaning with artificial chemical cleansers and smoking cause adverse effects on your pet’s health. These contain carcinogens which can be directly attributed to causing illnesses like mesothelioma, lung, bladder and nasal cancer in your pets!

    Remedy: Go green. Block out artificial carcinogen-laden cleansers and go for more healthy choices so that your pets have all carcinogen-free air to inhale.

    Outside pollution affects your pets

    Outside pollution also affects your pets. In a survey, it has been observed that dogs in areas of high-pollution levels show increased inflammation of the brain than those living in areas with a relatively low pollution. Pollution may even cause your pet to acquire certain Alzheimer-like illnesses.

    Smog from industry effects air quality for dogs

    • Remedy: Taking pets out for walks is obviously essential, but you need to keep in mind to choose an area less polluted by contaminants. Either shift your base to cleaner zones or take out your pets in areas away from roadsides and industries to reduce the effects of pollution.

    Using pesticides can be deadly for your dogs

    It has been observed that the use of artificial pesticides in personal farms can prove to be deadly to your dog. According to a study, around 30% of the dogs living in homes with artificial pesticide use are diagnosed with canine malignant lymphoma which is a form of cancer. It has also been observed that around 70% of these dogs do actually have a chance of acquiring this deadly disease.

    Pesticides effect air quality for dogs

    Remedy: Artificial pesticides do more harm than good. With its severe health effects on humans as well as animals, it is better to steer clear of them and opt for the more eco-friendly ones. Your furry friend shouldn’t be subjected to such needless risk factors.

    Indoor pollution decreases your pet’s lung capacity

    It has been found that houses with owners who smoke and pollute the air from burning wood are detrimental to the heath of pets. Cats and dogs in such houses are more prone to catch health problems like asthma and decreased lung functionality.

    • Remedy: Install a good air purifier, or air filters for central heating and cooling systems, in your house that limits indoor air pollution. The fresher and purer the air inside, the healthier your pets will be.  

    Using artificial room fresheners affects your pets

    While we may want our houses to smell good at all times, this comes with a price. If we go for artificial fresheners containing aerosols, these contaminants aren’t good for your pet’s health and result in various illnesses of the heart and lungs.

    • Remedy: Natural flowers work way better than artificial fragrances, and you should opt for them to give your furry friend a well deserved extension of good health.

    K9 Mask dog pollution filter

    New Animal Research for Wildfire Smoke

    New Animal Research for Wildfire Smoke

    Smoke from California’s deadliest wildfires last November blurred the sky as the air became among the world’s most polluted. The Camp Fire has long since been extinguished, but the health effects from the tiny particulate matter in the smoke, which penetrates into the lungs and ultimately into the bloodstream, could linger for years. No one is surprised when smoke brings a surge of emergency room visits for asthma or other breathing problems.

    Researcher for Vulnerability in Children

    More insidiously, people are also inhaling noxious fine particles measuring less than 2.5 microns, or a fifth the size of a particle of dust or pollen. Researchers have had a hard time quantifying exposure to those tiny particles as a smoky plume moves through an area or just how harmful the bursts of such air can be.

    But recent work suggests that children and babies are particularly vulnerable to long-lasting health effects. A new study found exposure to high levels of that tiny particulate matter, abbreviated as PM2.5, impairs the immune system of children.

    The Stanford University researchers tested the blood of 36 children exposed to wildfire smoke blown into Fresno in 2015 and found changes in a gene involved in the development and function of T cells, an important component of the immune system. The alteration made the gene less capable of producing T regulatory cells, potentially putting the children at greater risk of developing allergies or infection. “T regulatory cells act as peacekeepers in your immune system and keep everything on an even keel,” says Mary Prunicki, an allergy researcher and lead author. “You have fewer of these good, healthy immune cells around when you’re exposed to a lot of air pollution.”

    The smoke-exposed Fresno children also had significantly fewer Th1 cells, another component of the immune response, when compared with unexposed kids. Controlled fires to clear out underbrush, known as prescribed burns, also can cause health effects. Thirty-two children exposed to smoke from prescribed burns had immune changes, too, but the effect wasn’t as strong as it was for children exposed to wildfire smoke, the study showed.

    The research did not follow those children to see if their altered immune systems led to worse health outcomes, but an ongoing study at the University of California, Davis, raises some similar concerns.

    Animal Research for Wildfire Smoke Inhalation

    This one focused on rhesus macaques that live in an outdoor enclosure at the California National Primate Research Center. Rhesus monkeys give birth in the spring, so when wildfire smoke blew over the center in June and July of 2008, baby monkeys were exposed to 10 days of PM2.5 that exceeded the 24-hour air quality standard set by the Environmental Protection Agency.

    At three years of age (adolescents, by monkey standards), researchers examined 50 monkeys that had been exposed to wildfire smoke. They produced less of an immune-related protein (interleukin 6 or 8), as compared to monkeys not exposed to smoke as babies. That protein triggers inflammation to fight pathogens.

    A closer examination of the genes of a subset of these adolescent monkeys revealed immune-related genetic changes as well. “Clearly, the toxicants in air pollution are having a permanent effect on the DNA of immune cells,” says Lisa A. Miller, principal investigator and an immunologist at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. “It’s a change that stays with that cell for its entire life.”

    The responses appears to be specific to youngsters: Miller and her team did not see significant immune changes among monkeys exposed to smoke as adults. Though the altered immune systems have not led the monkeys to have more infections, all the smoke-exposed monkeys had “very profound changes” in lung structure and reduced lung function, Miller says.

    Now almost 10 years old, the monkeys still show the same immune changes. Smoke-exposed females have even passed on some of those changes to their offspring. The monkey research isn’t completely transferable to people. For starters, the monkeys live outdoors, so they breathe the smoke as long as it lingers in the air. But taken together, the two studies suggest that tiny particulate matter doesn’t only affect the lungs. “It points researchers in a direction of investigating the effects of wildfire smoke on the immune system. It’s an important pathway to consider,” says Colleen Reid of the University of Colorado Boulder, where she researches health effects of wildfire smoke. She was not involved in the studies.

    Health Risks of Global Climate Change

    As global climate change fuels larger and more severe wildfires, the potential health risks magnify. In 2008, the monkeys were exposed to a maximum PM2.5 level of 78 micrograms per cubic meter of air; on November 16, 2018, that air quality measure in downtown Sacramento hit 427. “Many cities in the West saw their highest-ever particulate levels in 2017 and 2018,” says Dan Jaffe, an environmental chemist at the University of Washington-Bothell. He and his colleagues reported that large urban effect in a paper released earlier this month.

    “More than 10 million people were exposed to levels of PM2.5 above the air quality standards.” The National Interagency Fire Center predicts an “above normal” potential for wildfires this summer for Northern California. People can take precautions to limit their exposure when wildfire smoke blankets their area. Some cities provide “clear air centers” as a wildfire version of the evacuation shelters used during hurricanes. The best strategy, of course, is to prevent or limit the spread of wildfires. In the meantime, deciphering their toll on human health has become an urgent priority.

    Dog Pollution Air Filter Mask Videos

    Dog Pollution Air Filter Mask Videos

    We have gathered a collection of videos about dog pollution masks. With the urbanization of major global cities and climate change events happening near populated areas there is a growing demand for people to protect their pets from toxic air pollution. 

    Here are several videos about dog owners, dog pollution mask companies, and veterinarians talking about air mask filters for dogs.

    Are Air Pollution Masks for Dogs - Fact of Fake News?

     

    South Korean Pollution Problem for Dogs

     

     

    K9 Mask - World's First Dog Pollution Mask

     

    California Veterinarian Dog Air Filter News Video

     

    More Dog Air Filter Muzzle Masks for Air Pollution...

    If you see or know of any other videos about dog's wearing air pollution masks please contact us and let us know so we can update our list of videos here.

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