Coupon Code: PUREAIR for 10% Off Order During Fire Season
0 Cart
Added to Cart
    You have items in your cart
    You have 1 item in your cart
    Total
    U.S. Officials Confirm Coronavirus Infection in NY German Shepherd

    U.S. Officials Confirm Coronavirus Infection in NY German Shepherd

    The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced a German Shepherd is the first dog to test positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes a COVID-19 infection. The dog, which is expected to make a full recovery, was tested after “it showed signs of respiratory illness,” according to a news release on Tuesday June 2, 2020 from the USDA.

    “One of the dog’s owners tested positive for COVID-19, and another showed symptoms consistent with the virus, prior to the dog showing...

    Read more

    Review: Air Filter Gas Masks for Dogs on Amazon

    Review: Air Filter Gas Masks for Dogs on Amazon

    This is a review of the TT Walk air filter mask (made in China) and the K9 Mask® dog air pollution filter (made in USA). Both of these air filters for dogs are available on Amazon.com.

    In the video review you will see the difference in the quality of materials, fit, adjustments, air filters, features, and benefits for each mask. There is a big difference in quality in these two air filter masks to effectively protect your pet from air pollution....

    Read more

    Wildfire smoke affect on dogs needing air pollution filter mask

    Protecting Dogs From Smoke Inhalation

    Smoke inhalation is not only dangerous for people - it can also have very serious consequences for dogs. Across parts of California including areas not in the path of the wild fires, air quality is being ranked as some of the worst in the world. As firefighters battle the wild fires animal welfare groups are working around the clock to rescue dogs. 

    Smoke Inhalation in Dogs

    Dr. Tina Wismer the Medical Director of the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center explains that, “With smoke inhalation, the amount of smoke a dog is exposed to will affect the symptoms. Animals that are caught in a fire can have difficulty breathing, inflammation and burns in the airways, and weakness. In some cases, dogs may initially appear normal and then develop a buildup of fluid in the lungs (pulmonary edema) up to 24 hours later.”

    Dogs in wildfire smoke poor air qualityShe further explains that dogs living near wildfires and breathing smoke may also experience eye irritation. Your dog may experience watery or red eyes, coughing, runny noses and panting if exposed to wildfire smoke. Dr. Heather B. Loenser, DVM Senior Veterinary Officer of the American Animal Hospital Association, also encourages dog guardians in smoke impacted areas to be on the lookout for the following symptoms:

    • Rapid respiratory rate (breathing more than 20-30 breaths per minute a rest)
    • Coughing; strained or noisy breathing
    • Bright red gums
    • Lethargy, seizures.

    Impact of Long-Term Smoke Inhalation in Dogs

    Although some symptoms of smoke inhalation are visible right away, dogs who have been exposed to smoke may get sick some time after the exposure. Jordan Holliday from Embrace Pet Insurance explains that, “once your pet has been rescued from a fire, he or she may appear pretty normal. Unfortunately, initial appearances can be deceiving. Even if your dogs didn’t come into contact with fire and get burned, they may have severe internal issues that need to be addressed.”

    Holliday cautions, “The most common cause of fire-related deaths in pets is not skin damage from burns, but organ damage from carbon monoxide toxicity. During a fire, carbon monoxide replaces the oxygen in the air. When a pet breathes carbon monoxide instead of oxygen, his organs will not be able to function correctly.” This is why it’s so important any dogs being rescued from wild fire impacted areas are seen by veterinarians.

    How To Minimize the Risk: Smoke Exposure for Dogs

    The most important thing you can do if your dog has been exposed to smoke is to get them out of the situation as soon as possible. If your dog has any of the above symptoms of smoke toxicity, Dr. Loenser advises you to get your dog seen by a veterinarian to receive oxygen therapy. Dr. Loesner explains that veterinary hospitals have oxygen cages that allow (all but the largest) dogs to rest in an oxygen-rich environment.

    Dogs need air pollution filter masks for wildfire smokeGiant dogs that are too large for the oxygen cages can be provided oxygen therapy through a nasal cannula with allows oxygen to flow into a dog’s nose. “Treating a dog with oxygen is one of my favorite treatments because I love seeing the look of relief when they realize they can breathe easier,” says Dr. Loesner. Here is a video example of a dog receiving oxygen therapy from the Castlegar Fire Department in British Columbia, Canada. animal medical center ny oxygen therapy. Dogs being rescued by first responders are increasingly being treated with oxygen therapy on the scene, but Dr. Loenser advises that any dogs rescued from wildfires or any other fire should be directed to a veterinarian within an hour of being rescued.

    Caring For Dogs in Poor Air Quality Conditions

    If you are living in an area where air quality conditions are poor, the best thing you can do is to keep your dog inside as much as possible. Limiting the length and frequency of walks and staying out of outdoor spaces like dog parks is advised until air quality improves. Trick training or Scent Work games are a great way to keep your dog mentally and physically exercised in your house or apartment. Humans in areas impacted by wildfires are being encouraged to wear face masks or respirators to minimize the risks associated with breathing smoke. There are a few different masks on the market for dogs such as Dog Pollution Mask, and goggles like these from Doggles that may reduce eye irritation from the smoke. Unfortunately, unlike masks for people these masks are less readily available.

    Which dogs need air filter muzzle masks?Having just moved with my dogs from New York to Oregon (which in recent years has had more issues with wildfires like neighboring Northern California), I am considering buying air pollution masks for my dogs.  Don't do this after a wildfire in your area. Of course, this means once I have the K9 dog pollution masks, I’ll need to begin slowly desensitizing my dogs to wearing them. If an air quality emergency were to occur, my dogs need to already comfortable with wearing and breathing through something on their faces – a sensation that might feel strange to anyone.

    Which Dogs Are at Risk for Complications from Smoke Exposure

    Smoke inhalation is dangerous for all dogs regardless of breed or age, but there are specific concerns with some breeds. Dr. Loenser explains that dogs with short noses - bulldogs, pugs and Boston terriers, to name a few - are especially at risk. Additionally, Loesner explains that very young and very old dogs of any breed can be more fragile and at risk for medical complications from smoke inhalation.

    Being Prepared

    The wildfires in California are a good reminder about the importance of having an evacuation plan for your family including all your dogs. Natural disasters can strike at any time and it’s important to be prepared. Make sure your dog is wearing a collar with updated identification tags. In your vehicle it’s a good idea to have easily accessible digital copies of proof of vaccination, photos of your dog (in case they become lost), spare leashes, food, and any prescriptions your dog might need.

    Jordan Holliday advises to, when developing an evacuation plan, have a designated person in your household responsible for evacuating the dog. If no one is able to get your dog(s) out, this person needs to, “let the fire department personnel know that he or she is still inside the home. Have your pet microchipped so that in the event your pet is able to escape, you can find him or her after the fire. Place a sticker or identification in the window of your home so that fire department personnel know there is a pet in the home if a fire breaks out when you aren’t there.”

    Safety Plan for Your Dog During Wildfire Smoke

    Safety Plan for Your Dog During Wildfire Smoke

    With all the recent wildfires in California, Washington, Oregon, and Montana we would like to remind you of proper fire safety and prevention for families with pets. Statistics show that half a million pets are affected and 40,000 pets are killed by fires annually. So before a fire starts, here are some preventative measures to take:

    1. Create a fire escape plan.
    2. Set up a meeting place and multiple routes in order to exit your house safely and quickly.
    3. Put a Pet Rescue Fire Safety Sticker on your window. This will indicate what species of pets you have, and how many, so that firefighters will know who to look for. You can pick up these stickers (normally free of charge) at any humane society or veterinary office.
    4. Free your home (and spaces surrounding where your outdoor pets live) of brushy areas. This will help deplete the fire sources around your home.
    5. Know your pets hiding places. The smell of smoke and sound of burning substances are scary for pets. Most often they will become frightened and hide in a place where they feel secure. Knowing your pets hiding places will help you find them quickly so that everyone can exit the home.
    6. Create a pet emergency kit. This kit should supply your pet with an adequate amount of food, any prescriptions your pet needs and his/her vaccine history in case they need to be boarded.
    7. Be aware when lighting candles. Puppy tails and pouncing kittens can make a harmless candle an extreme fire hazard. Be aware of your pets’ location when candles are lit and place them out of harms’ way.
    8. Change the batteries in your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors twice a year.

    Prepare-For-Wildfire-Smoke-Dog-Pollution-KitIn the event of a fire in or near your home always remember to secure your pets on a leash or in a carrier to prevent them from running away in fright. Don’t forget to bring your pet emergency kit, enough food for one week, their favorite toy and/or blanket, a food and water bowl and their ID tags.

    Unfortunately, many families do not have enough time to get to a safe place before the fire is upon them. For this reason, Aspen Grove would like to teach you how to properly care for your pet if they are suffering from smoke inhalation. Smoke inhalation is a serious medical condition and should not be taken lightly. Chemicals released from burned materials such as carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and cyanide are dangerous and poisonous for your pet. Inhalation of these chemicals can result in severe lung injury, burnt airways and death. The signs of smoke inhalation can include but are not limited to:

    • Severe coughing Red,
    • inflamed eyes
    • Weakness/lethargy
    • Depression
    • Bright Red, blue or pale mucous membranes
    • Singed or burnt hair
    • Respiratory distress and/or difficulty breathing
    • Gagging/vomiting
    • Open-mouth breathing
    • Foaming at the mouth
    • Seizures Squinting Skin and/or ocular burns

    Assessing the situation is important, but taking your pet to clean, oxygenated air is your priority. If your pet is still inside the building, loosely drape a wet towel over his/her eyes and nose to prevent further smoke inhalation. Once out of the burning area, ask the fire personnel for an oxygen mask for your pet; this will reduce your pets’ risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. If you are not able to take your pet to a veterinarian right away, than place your pet in a steamy room or near a humidifier in order to increase the amount of moisture in their lungs. The amount of damage to your pet may not be apparent for several hours, so take your pet to a veterinarian as soon as possible for assessment and stabilization.

    Hopefully you will never have to deal with the trauma of a fire taking your home. However, certain preventative measures should be taken if you and your pet are near a wildfire even if you think you are not in harms’ way. First, decrease the amount of exercise time your pet gets outside. Avoid dog parks and long walks.

    As we all know, pets have a keen sense of smell. They will be able to smell the smoke from far away and may become irritable or frightened. Depending on the distance between you and the fire, your pets’ respiratory system may become stressed and gagging/coughing or other symptoms may occur. Always offer your pet ample amounts of fresh water and of course, give them lots of love!

     

    Net Orders Checkout

    Item Price Qty Total
    Subtotal $0.00
    Shipping
    Total

    Shipping Address

    Shipping Methods

    x